Union looks to second reading of Crossrail Bill

01 July 2005

ASLEF has welcomed plans for the Second Reading of the Crossrail Bill in Parliament, due to take place within the next two weeks.

Cross London Rail Links (Crossrail) is a 50/50 joint venture company formed by Transport for London (TfL) and the Department for Transport (DfT).

Crossrail is tasked with promoting and developing two new routes through London: Crossrail line 1 (West-East) and Crossrail line 2 (NorthEast-SouthWest).

The intention is that Crossrail 1 would come in from Maidenhead in the west via Slough and West Drayton, before going underground before Paddington, passing through central stations at Bond Street and Tottenham Court Road and emerging in two routes after Whitechapel in the east – one via the Isle of Dogs to Abbeywood and the other passing through Stratford and heading out to Shenfield.

Crossrail 2 is earmarked to link Dalston in the north with Clapham Junction in the south, again passing through Tottenham Court Road. 

Crossrail was allocated a budget of £154m in 2001 by central Government to carry out feasibility work for both Lines 1 and 2, and to acquire Parliamentary powers for Line 1. 

A recent development has been the production of a supplementary Environmental Statement detailing with the construction timetable and strategy, noise insulation, climate change, and the impact on health and assessments of stations at Hanbury, Bow and Romford.

Copies can be found here

ASLEF acting General Secretary Keith Norman says the project is essential to offering reliable transport options for all parts of the capital but stresses that it is not only a ‘London issue’. 

‘The success of Crossrail is of concern to the whole country, because it is essential to make London’s social and cultural treasury accessible to everyone in the UK,’ he says. 

ASLEF acting General Secretary Keith Norman says the project is essential to offering reliable transport options for all parts of the capital but stresses that it is not only a ‘London issue’. 

‘The success of Crossrail is of concern to the whole country, because it is essential to make London’s social and cultural treasury accessible to everyone in the UK,’ he says.

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